Anaheim Funk Jam of the Week!

Since it’s the late Michael Jackson’s birthday today and all, it seemed right that this week’s Anaheim Funk Jam of the Week be Gift of Dreams’ “Moonwalk.” Now go bump this in the bucket!

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Charges Dropped Against the “GIAC 2”

Girl in a Coma’s recent summer tour was clouded over by an incident that occurred before the release of their second album “Trio B.C.” An altercation took place at a bar in Houston which resulted in the arrest of singer/guitarist Nina Diaz and bassist Jenn Alva. The two had been facing serious charges of felony assault on a public servant until yesterday. The band’s website reported the following:

Many of you know that the band has been dealing with legal issues that we haven’t been able to talk about until now. Today Jenn and Nina went before a Grand Jury in Houston, Texas to face charges of felony assault on a public servant. We are happy to announce that both Jenn and Nina received a “No Bill” which means that they have decided not to indict the girls and the case is over with no criminal case against the girls. The band is relieved that this ordeal is over and that justice system worked. Thank you to our family, friends, club owners and especially all the fans that stood behind us and believed in us throughout it all. xo-Jenn,Nina and Phanie

The legal mess that entangled Girl in a Coma depleted their savings and all the touring they did this past summer, in effect, was to begin recuperating from the losses. Now with the charges finally dropped, the girls can put everything behind them and resume doing what they do best: rock!

Subversive Historian – 08/28/09

The March on Washington

Back in the day on August 28th, 1963, hundreds of thousands of people participated in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Black union leader A Phillip Randolph first proposed the idea for a mass convergence on the nation’s capital. With organizational help from various civil rights groups, the planned demonstration faced disagreements from parties involved as to its stated objective. Some groups wanted to focus on black poverty while others wanted to show public support for the Kennedy administration’s proposed civil rights legislation. When the march finally took place, John Lewis of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee had to tone down the criticisms he levied against President Kennedy. The demonstration would later culminate on the steps of the Lincoln memorial with Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I have a dream,” speech.

The following year, the Civil Rights Act would be passed into law due in part to that massive show of support for the civil rights movement during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Cordero Returns to the West Coast!

Based in New York City, the band Cordero has been quietly perfecting its unique blend of indie-rock rhythms infused with the infectious sounds of Latin music. Fronted by Puerto Rican songstress Ani Cordero and featuring members of various ethnic backgrounds, the band’s songs intermingle her soothing vocals with musical arrangements that are irresistibly danceable on multiple sonic fronts. The Village Voice attests to this phenomenon having said of Cordero’s live performances that they “usually wind up as street parties outside the venue.”

Cordero are making their way once more to the West Coast for tour dates in support of their latest album “De Dónde Eres,” released a year ago to critical acclaim. The band will be making a local stop this Saturday, August 29th at the Levitt Pavilion Memorial Park in Pasadena, an outside venue already conducive to becoming a street party, but before that, singer/guitarist Ani Cordero made time to speak with LatinoLA about her music.

Read our Q & A exchange here:

http://latinola.com/story.php?story=7794

Subversive Historian – 08/27/09

The Kellogg-Briand Pact

Back in the day on August 27th, 1928, the Kellogg-Briand Pact was signed in the city of Paris by fifteen nations pledging to halt wars of aggression. In the wake of the ravages of the First World War, the United States and France had originally approached the notion of the pact through a bilateral agreement. U.S. Secretary of State Frank Kellogg and French Foreign Minister Aristide Briand discussed formally abolishing any possibility of war solely between the two nations, when Kellogg thought it best to extend the invitation to all nations. Among the initial signatories to the pact that called for the “renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy” were France, the U.S., the U.K., Germany, and Japan. Forty-seven nations would follow in formal adherence. Of course, wars of aggression would also soon follow, as was the case, for instance, when Italy invaded Ethiopia.

By not clearly delineating the boundaries of self-defense and having no enforcement behind it, the Kellogg-Briand Pact was practically useless in achieving its aim as evidenced most tragically by the outbreak of World War II.

Last Lila Update

“Shake Away” your disappointment, Lila Downs is coming back to Anaheim. After fans learned of the unfortunate news that Downs had to cancel her concert that would have taken place last night, the Grove of Anaheim quickly worked with the singer to reschedule the date. Ticket buyers, hold on to your boletos because they will be honored for the new concert date of Sunday, October 25th! If you can’t make the show, refunds are available.

Subversive Historian – 08/26/09

Fannie Sellins

Back in the day on August 26th, 1919, labor organizer Fannie Sellins was brutally gunned down in West Pennsylvania. Dubbed ‘the angel of mercy’ for her unionizing efforts, Sellins had successfully organized workers in Missouri and West Virginia before United Mine Workers of America leader Philip Murray, impressed by her dedication, offered her a position with the union. Sellins then moved to Pennsylvania to begin organizing in the western part of the state. Assigned to the Allegheny-Kiski Valley, the area had a dubious reputation for repressing unionizing efforts. Undeterred, Sellins successfully organized workers anyway in the anti-union lands known to labor as “Black Valley.” As part of her efforts, Sellins was present on that fateful night when the workers of the Allegheny Coal and Coke Company were confronted by company guards and deputies. In the ensuing violence, she was shot to death as was a miner named Joseph Starzeleski.

As has been all too historically the case with the criminal injustice system, no one was ever convicted of killing Fannie Sellins. The “angel of mercy” was shown none.