Subversive Historian – 03/20/09

Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Back in the day on March 20th, 1857, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” was published. Stowe, a white woman, became motivated to write her most recognized work after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. The novel, which was to become second only to sales of the Bible in the 19th century, attempted to illustrate the evils of the institution of slavery by contrasting the goodness of Uncle Tom, a slave, with the cruelty of his master Simon Legree. Defenders of slavery in South were angered by Stowe’s account and deemed it a work of slander. If Stowe’s detractors sought to persuade her to the supposed benevolence of the institution, they sure chose an odd way of displaying it when they sent a severed ear of a slave to the writer in a package.

However well meaning Stowe was in writing “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” the anti-slavery novel nevertheless created and popularized stereotypes of African-Americans such as mammies and pickaninnies – all of which I’m sure the former mayor of Los Alamitos Dean Grose would claim to be unaware of!

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3 responses to “Subversive Historian – 03/20/09

  1. Not to mention what she did to Victoria Woodhull.

  2. What did she do to Victoria Woodhull?

  3. “…We think (presidential) political campaigns are rough and dirty now; Victoria found the same to be true in 1872. Backlash against her campaign eventually made her and her family homeless. At the same time, Victoria had picked up a powerful enemy – Harriet Beecher Stowe (the famous author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin). At one point, Stowe said of Victoria (through a fictional representation in her novel My Wife and I):

    “…no woman that was not willing to be dragged through every kennel, and slopped into every dirty pail of water, like an old mop, would ever consent to run as a candidate. Why it’s an ordeal that kills a man. And what sort of a brazen tramp of a woman would it be that could stand it, and come out of it without being killed? Would it be any kind of a woman that we should want to see at the head of our government?”
    http://historyandwomen.blogspot.com/2008/11/victoria-woodhull-1838-1927.html

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